A Post-Grad Job Search in Times of the Coronavirus: What It’s Like and What You Can Do

A Post-Grad Job Search in Times of the Coronavirus: What It’s Like and What You Can Do

As I finish up my internship with Enterprise Iowa, I have also graduated with my bachelor’s degree from Iowa State University. In a world forever changed by COVID-19, not only is health on the line making last semesters and graduation ceremonies look very different, but there are millions of graduates looking for jobs in one of the most insecure economies we have seen in history.

 

Advocates for the character of this generation will say that we are a generation of activism. I remember a professor of mine sending admiration to my classmates and our generation saying something of the following nature:

“My generation and generations before you guys understand that the world can be a dark place, but we tend to accept that’s just the way things are. Your generation understands that the world can be a dark place, but instead you do not accept that’s just the way things are. Instead you see an opportunity to change it.”

So, as we have seen exemplified by this pandemic in multiple ways, the world can sometimes be a dark place. But if anyone is prepared to enter a world of uncertainty, my generation might just be the ones cut out for the challenge.

 

Although industries as a whole may be scaling back labor costs and become cautious of new hires, it is important to note that jobs are still out there. More importantly, there are companies who are finding increased demand and a need to scale up their business in light of this pandemic. Also, many of these companies are offering phone and video interviews and allowing new hires to work from home as they train and get accustomed to their new job until it is deemed safe to return to the workplace. I have also seen more fully remote positions than I ever remember seeing in the past. And, in the age of technology, it is much easier to find these jobs–and find these jobs safely from your couch–with company website career pages and online job boards such as Indeed, Glassdoor, and Monster. Additionally, LinkedIn is a great source for job postings tied in with a social media aspect. With these resources, it is easy to browse a wide variety of jobs that may pique your interest and match your qualifications. Personally, I’m a big user of Indeed, LinkedIn, and company website career pages.

 

This is a post targeted towards 2020 graduates, but there is also a record number of unemployed Americans since the Great Depression. Therefore, here are some basic tips for anyone who is in need of employment:

  • Don’t be afraid to reach out to people in your network. Employment is largely about who you know, not what you know. Even if your mom’s best friend is currently unable to bring you on at her office, she may know someone else who is hiring. And, the worst answer you can receive is no, and the answer will always be no if you don’t try.
  • Create an aesthetically pleasing resume and cover letter to represent your personal brand. The content, while it does have importance, is probably less important than you think. It is more important to catch the employer’s eye when sifting through a stack of applications. A black and white page filled with 10-point text will probably be overlooked simply because it is boring to look at, not because your resume isn’t impressive. So, keep things simple, easy to read, and add something interesting to catch the eye.
  • Be open to applying to and accepting jobs that you may have not previously considered. Especially if you are struggling to find employment, have an open mind when applying for jobs and broaden your horizons. You may be surprised to find out what you enjoy doing, and even if you later figure out that you don’t like it, you can always search for new employment down the road when the opportunity presents itself.
  • Apply, apply, apply, and then apply some more. You can expect to hear back from just 10% of jobs you apply to. Additionally, it is unlikely that all of that 10% will result in a job offer (and that 10% statistic is under normal economic circumstances). This statistic is not meant to be discouraging or daunting, it just goes to show that applying to a multitude of jobs is important. So, when it comes to the success of job applications, you will find safety in numbers. And remember, you will face a lot of rejection, so try not to take that too personally.

 

Here are some other notable facts and pointers to consider while you continue your job search:

  • Under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, federally administered student loan payments are suspended until September 30th of this year. This act only applies to federal loans and not private loans; however, if applicable, contact your private loan provider to ask about payment relief.
  • Research COVID-19 relief scholarships. These funds are obviously not a guarantee, but it may be worth it to apply. Some websites worth checking out are Scholarships.com, Scholly, and FastWeb.
  • For immediate relief, see if you qualify for unemployment benefits while you continue your job search. Unemployment benefits and qualifications vary by state, but Iowa’s fact sheet and application can be found here.

 

All in all, it is important to stay hopeful. That may be easier said than done in the current times we are facing, but try to hone in on the things that bring you joy while keeping sight of the bigger picture. Eventually, something good will come to us all—in this case in the form of a new job—and we will all settle into our new normal.

 

Quick links to websites mentioned in this article:

Indeed: https://www.indeed.com/

Glassdoor: https://www.glassdoor.com/index.htm

Monster: https://www.monster.com/

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/

Scholarships.com: https://www.scholarships.com/

Scholly: https://myscholly.com/

FastWeb: https://www.fastweb.com/

Iowa Workforce Development: https://www.iowaworkforcedevelopment.gov/file-claim-unemployment-insurance-benefits

Businesses Prepare for Venture Into Nomanneslonde

Businesses Prepare for Venture Into Nomanneslonde

What is the proper metaphor for the situation in which many business owners and managers now find themselves? How do you describe the territory in between the critical need to get business and the economy moving again, and the need to protect the safety and well-being of the people making the economy function?

Printing and distributing new money to keep businesses and people afloat increases debt and can be the cause of serious, unintended and long-term consequences. Moving people into settings where a highly contagious new virus with many unknown factors is still present can also produce bad, sometimes terminal, results. To borrow a very old term, the most appropriate metaphor seems to be “No Man’s Land.” Many are choosing sides. Out of fear and concern for public health and the safety of family, some wish to continue to keep things closed. Others, whose viability as a company, organization or even household are at stake, wish to get back to work and start earning income again as soon as possible. The space in between is where the solutions must be found.

It’s not an easy problem to solve for many organizations with a business model built on a certain volume of activity. Theaters, stadiums, commercial airplanes, restaurants and bars require certain numbers of customers to break even or make a profit. Impose a 50% capacity rule or require a six-foot “set-back” between customers, and the previous profit and loss calculations just may not work anymore. So, what should a business do as the temporary financial assistance programs begin to expire?

Make a Plan for Alternative Scenarios

It’s tough to plan in the midst of a crisis, but it is a necessary exercise. Based on the current rules that apply to a particular business type, consider the following scenarios.

  • What would happen if those rules are extended for an additional one, two or six months? Longer? Do the math.
  • What would happen if some rules are relaxed, such as occupancy limits of 50% or 70% of maximum capacity? Or what happens if customer behavior doesn’t return to “normal” after rules are relaxed? Again, do the math.
  • Account for changes in the workforce. Will 100% or 50% of employees be available to return to work, and will they feel safe in returning to work?
  • Account for changes in the supply chain. Will the resources and materials required to make the product be available, or has there been a disruption in supplies and materials? How much can be produced given alternative conditions?

Companies and organizations must do this planning. Larger companies and manufacturers are already doing this, and resources such as CIRAS at Iowa State University are helping them. Smaller businesses also need to be doing this planning. What business plan or path will provide the greatest opportunity for success? What steps are needed to implement it?

Take Steps to Provide a Safe Work Environment

Federal and state public health officials are publishing and regularly updating guidelines or suggestions for operating safely as things begin to be “reopened”. Review them carefully and decide what the best options are. Here is a short list of recently published information from authoritative sources.

Communicate With Business Partners and Employees

Now is not the time to hunker down and wait for the next proclamation. Make a call or set up a video conference with the appropriate professionals, including the accountants, lenders, employment professionals, attorneys, landlords and business peers. Put the facts on the table and ask for advice and help. They want and need their customers to survive and succeed.

Employees and contractors also need to be part of the conversation. Answer their questions. Ask for their input. Show them what is going to be done to provide for a safe work environment. Explore best practices and options. There is no one “best practice,” so welcome ideas and use a consensus-building approach.

As events unfold, expect to see professional firms and trade associations step forward with legal, human resources, financial and general business advice. For example, here are two specific webinars with companion slide decks and resources published by legal and employment service providers with operations in the Des Moines area.

Business owners and managers should ask their affiliated professional service providers to help get them connected with similar privately sponsored but publicly accessible resources. Importantly, share this information with your colleagues, peers, employees and contractors as it becomes available.

The Greater Des Moines Partnership has launched a new resource, DSM Forward with industry specific and business function “playbooks” and an FAQ, which provides a framework for business owners and managers to develop action plans for reopening. These playbooks are not recipes for reopening, but rather are outlines that can be used by individual businesses to make decisions about how various issues will be handled based on their unique characteristics and circumstances.

Do you have a need for more specific information, or do you have suggestion for a topic or issue that should be included in a future DSM Forward playbook? DSM has published a short survey to organize those questions and suggestions.

Summary

Reopening is like stepping into a “Nomanneslonde” in many respects. There are many unknowns, but we think it is possible to move the economy forward with thoughtful business planning, care for the health, safety and well-being of everyone at work and in the marketplace, and open and frequent communications with business partners and co-workers. Onward!

Have an idea or best practice for reopening? Share it with us!